Category Archives: Linux

Blog tools in Linux

I decided to look at what blog tools are available in Linux. I want to  use them with my WordPress.com blog, of course, so that is how I tested them.

I have only checked out a couple of tools, but I find them mostly not working very well with WordPress.com. The only one that has worked at all is QTM, so far.

BloGTK

This is the recommended tool for Linux, according to the WordPress site. It won’t install in Oneiric. I expect I could make it work if I fiddled with some settings for apt-get, maybe. But the author is not working on it, so no real desire to try.

gnome-blog

Broken. Intended for Gnome 2. One of the libraries is not compatible with Gnome 3: “python-gnomeapplet”. Maybe there is no concept of applet in Gnome 3?

Drivel

I tried it. Editing a new post worked. There were error messages connecting to WordPress.com. I was not able to post the blog because it could not get permission to write.

QTM

This one was able to post a message, but left the message in the “draft” state on WordPress.com. That may be my fault – there is a “draft/publish” drop down on the app.

Because it was “posted”, it put the file into some sort of archive state, so that the next time I went to edit, I had to fiddle around to be able to see it. Finished editing the post on WordPress.com.

Other options

There is at least one plugin for FireFox for editing blogs. But I was looking for tools for Gnome so I can try out Gnome 3, so I haven’t tried it yet.

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Installing Mint 12

I installed Mint on my laptop the other day. Then I installed Cinnamon, which is Mint’s Gnome 3 based interface. I wanted to learn about Gnome 3’s powers, but without all the Gnome 3 hassle.

Installing Mint

I have to get some DVD’s – they want to put a GB in the installer. Fortunately there is a CD version without Office software and without codecs. Somepages indicate there are Windows installers, but I didn’t find one. It would be nice to have one for my work computer.

Installing Cinnamon

Installing Cinnamon was easy. Select Cinnamon in Synaptic and install it. Err, no, not in the list of selected items when I tried to choose at login time. Select cinnamon-session and install that (the notes said to do that). And now I am in Cinnamon.

Actually, I liked “Nate”, Mint’s Gnome 2 interface, a bit better. I liked having the menu as one of the choices when you select the thingy in the top left corner. In Cinnamon, the menu is in the bottom left.

Cinnamon Menu

In the Cinnamon menu, there are three columns. The left column is favorites, with some stuff you can’t get rid of like shutdown and lock screen. When the mouse is over an item, the bottom of the menu block, on the right (as far away from the favorites as possible) is the name and one line description of that application.

It actually makes sense to be on the bottom right, you should soon know what your favorites are, and the right column is the apps of the highlighted category in the middle column.

Faves can be removed using the right click menu. Also, you can right-click on a program to add it to favorites.

Firefox mysterious disappearing menus

By default, the Firefox menu system is missing. It turns out that Ubuntu disappeared it by installing a plugin that moved it to the Unity menu location, which is presumably some Mac-like common menu location.

So I could not use Firefox menus to get at the Addon Manager to kill the creepy addon.

I used a command line parameter to get at it, which I got from some web page I can’t find now. However, you can type “about:addons” in the address bar to get there.

The Guilty Addon is called “Global Menu Bar Integration”, and you can’t uninstall it, you can only disable it.

Broadcom Drivers

My laptop has Broadcom wifi, 4318 style. On all the other Ubuntu versions I have installed, I had to install the right thing, run the right script and then maybe remove the right lines from a config file.

This time, I was able to search in Synaptic for “Broadcom”, and install the package b43-fwcutter, and it worked! Wow!

Yet Another Dave, A?

I appreciate Dave’s sense of rumour, his up-to-wait technical knowledge, and  his assistance.

His wiki has some (ok lotsa) stuff I don’t have.

Xubuntu in

Xubuntu in.

XP usage down.

I made the Kitchen Computer dual boot, so the kids don’t have to use Windows, and deal with all those bugs and the malware.

And so I don’t have to re-install it, yet again.

I am using Ubuntu 8.04 on the other computer, and KDE at work.
I like KDE, so I thought Kubuntu 10.10 would be fun at home.

Not so nice. It swaps on 512MB with Firefox running.

So I tried Xubuntu.

  • Added Java and Flash for the kids.
  • Added the fix for IPv6 that I blogged about before.

Now everyone is OK using Linux in the kitchen.

Downside?
Youtube in full screen mode is choppy. Why?

  • Driver for Intel MB?
  • Gnu’s Gnash instead of Flash?

Dunno. Not worried about it. Xubuntu rocks our house.

IPv6 lookup pain in Firefox

According to Google, Firefox has been slow for some people for several years, if they don’t set “network.dns.disableIPv6” to “true” in “about:config”.

Yup, this issue is still a problem for FireFox users. Mozilla has not decided to “check once” for an IPv6 DNS server and use only IPv4 for a while, like an hour, before checking again.

I may also have this problem on my other machine, which is running Ubuntu 9.04. This is on the Kitchen computer, and when my wife says it’s way too slow in Linux and she’s going to boot back into Windows, I had to find out why.

So when we get IPv6 in our house, I will have to switch back.
Aww, who am I kidding – that will be years from now and my 512MB RAM machine will be long gone.

Firefox sync << Xmarks, so far

I have used Xmarks for a couple of years. I track the same tech stuff at work as I do for my blog and personal research, so synchronizing is useful. With Xmarks about to disappear (not so likely now), I quickly installed Firefox Sync. It seemed to work, at first, but then one of my machines got into a state where all its bookmarks were gone, and it couldn’t get them back from the Firefox sync server.

I eventually fixed it, by configuring a different Firefox instance to push its bookmarks everywhere, then I was able to get the info onto the losing machine.

Xmarks is not perfect either. On my machines with 512MB RAM and one CPU, Xmarks ties down the machine completely while it syncs. Can’t do nuthin!

OCLUG at Algonquin this time

OCLUG had to move to the U o f O for the September meeting, due to Algonquin’s inability to plan ahead. Over the last year, the day of week has moved around a bit, too. So it is useful to remind people that the next meeting is planned for:

Tues, Oct 5 at Algonquin, room P211A

Building P is the “Police and Public Safety Institute”. It is almost as far east of Woodroffe as you can get on the Algonquin Woodroffe campus.

Bus access is adequate. Walk from the Baseline Station.

Cars normally park in parking lots 8 or 9. As far as I know, you can still park for free in the evening.

The next meeting is planned for November 2 in the same location.